Monthly Archives: January 2013

Review: Safe Harbor by Rosemary McCracken

When a young woman abandons her infant son with financial advisor Patricia Tierney, Pat is forced to take care of him, even though she is still grieving the death of her errant husband Michael. When Tommy’s mother is murdered, Tommy’s plight touches Pat in an unexpected way. She realises that Tommy’s life might be in danger too and she sets out to find out who is pursuing him and why.

In Safe Harbor, Rosemary McCracken weaves a tale of intrigue and suspense that will keep you turning the pages until the heart-stopping climax.

Find Safe Harbor on Amazon:

http://www.authorsally.net/AmazonSafeHarbor

Rosemary’s next book in the Pat Tierney series, Black Water, can be found at:

http://www.authorsally.net/AmazonBlackWater

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Chameleon by Kathy Stewart: free ebook download

front cover copyFor those of you who missed out on this at Christmas time and in celebration of Australia Day, I’m making my debut novel, Chameleon, available as a FREE ebook for three days, 26, 27 and 28 January. Please download it at

http://www.authorsally.net/Chameleon

and, if you enjoy it, please consider posting a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads. Thanks!
If you don’t have a Kindle, you should still be able to download the Kindle version via an app on your tablet, iPad or other device.
Please feel free to pass this offer on to your family, friends and colleagues as well.
Chameleon is a saga set in South Africa and the surrounding territories between 1914 and 1946, and traces the lives of five main characters from two families as they unravel the mystery that triggers events at the start of the book.
Chameleon was shortlisted for the Crime Writers Association Debut Dagger Award in the UK in 2010.
Here is some more info:
It’s 1914.
Troops mass for war in Europe, and even at a remote trading store in Transkei, South Africa, the Moss family and their sometimes-guest Richard feel the impact on their lives. Then Richard enlists, taking fifteen-year-old Fred with him. Albert and Martha are furious and afraid for Fred, but fourteen-year-old Eve is shattered, her hopes of eloping with Richard dashed. All she has to remember him by is a strange wooden mannikin …
If you’d like to read an interview about Chameleon I did in December 2012, you can find it here.
Recent comments about Chameleon are:
‘It’s a real page-turner! There are so many twists and turns.’
‘I can’t wait to read more.’
‘I’ve started your book and am so enjoying it!’
‘I read your book yesterday and thoroughly enjoyed it.’
Happy reading and I look forward to hearing from you in 2013!

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Learnt or Learned?

This question comes up from time to time: which is the correct past tense of the verb learn? Should it be learnt or learned?
The answer is that both are correct, but that learnt is more common in Britain, whereas learned is more popular in the USA.
Learned can also be pronounced learn-ed and the meaning is then entirely different. There is a world of difference between a learnt text and a learned or learned (learn-ed) text. The former means that the text has been absorbed by the student, whereas the latter could mean the same, or it could equally mean that the text is scholarly, cultured or erudite. To avoid confusion, it would be best to use learnt in this case, but, whatever you do, try to be consistent in your use throughout a document.

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Pedaled or pedalled?

This is another of those words that can be spelled either way.
Pedaled is correct in the USA, whereas pedalled is correct in Britain and Australia. The same goes for pedaling and pedalling. The first is correct in the USA and the second in Britain and Australia.

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Whisky or whiskey?

How should you spell this word: whisky or whiskey? This is a tricky one as there are a few ways to interpret this, but I’ll do my best to explain.
Traditionally, the Scots, Canadians and Japanese spell the word whisky, whereas Americans and the Irish spell the word whiskey.
So, how should you spell the word? You really have two choices. You can either spell it according to the convention in your country or according to the country of origin. Hence, for example, Scottish whisky, or Irish whiskey.

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Smolder or smoulder?

This is another of those spelling conundrums. Should it be smolder or smoulder?

The answer is that both are correct.

Smolder is the USA spelling of smoulder, which is used in British and Australian English.

The Macquarie dictionary definition of smoulder (smolder) is:

Verb:

  1. to burn or smoke without a flame.
  2. to exist or continue in a suppressed state or without outward demonstration.
  3. to display repressed feelings, especially of indignation: his eyes smouldered.

Noun:

  1. dense smoke resulting from slow or suppressed combustion.
  2. a smouldering fire.

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Savor or savour?

Which spelling is correct: savor or savour?

The answer is that both are correct.

Savor is the USA spelling, while savour is used in Britain and Australia.

The Macquarie dictionary lists the meaning as:

Noun:

  1. the quality in a substance which affects the sense of taste or of smell.
  2. a particular taste or smell.
  3. distinctive quality or property.
  4. power to excite or interest.

Verb:

  1. to give a savour to; season; flavour.
  2. to perceive by taste or smell, especially with relish.
  3. to give oneself to the enjoyment of.

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