Monthly Archives: November 2014

The Armoured Train Incident – Out Now!

3D 1000 gradient

A hundred and fifteen years ago today, on 15 November 1899, near the start of the Anglo-Boer War, an armoured train manned by British soldiers and containing a young British journalist named Winston Churchill ground its way towards Chieveley in the misty hinterland of Natal, South Africa. The Boers, those fearsome, brave Afrikaner farmers known for their horsemanship and marksmanship, had proved to be a fearsome and formidable force. So as the train steamed along the track, the soldiers were well aware that the often elusive enemy could strike at any time.

The Armoured Train Incident commemorates this event and pays tribute to the brave men involved, including Alexander James Stewart and Charles Wagner, who both played a part that day.

The Armoured Train Incident is available in print from Amazon as well as other online bookstores, and as an ebook from Kindle, Smashwords and most other ebook retailers, including iBooks and Sony.

Here are the long links should you need them:

Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Armoured-Train-Incident-Kathy-Stewart/dp/1503093859

Kindle:

http://www.amazon.com/Armoured-Train-Incident-Kathy-Stewart-ebook/dp/B00PE59P8O/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/491997

Leave a Comment

Filed under Articles, Authors, Book Reviews, News, Writers

Further or farther?

Have you ever wondered about the difference between these two words?

Both further and farther refer to distance. Further is more commonly used in a figurative sense, whereas farther is used in a more literal sense to refer to an actual distance.

Examples:

The farther they went from the town, the denser the woods became.

The thief stole whenever he could to further his own ends.

Farther and farther they travelled, until ‘home’ was but blip on the distant horizon.

Further to this, I have nothing more to say.’

Leave a Comment

Filed under Editing Tips, Uncategorized